Baruch Spinoza

Baruch (de) Spinoza; in Dutch: ; and in European Portuguese: . He was born Baruch Espinosa; later as an author and a correspondent known as Benedictus de Spinoza, and anglicized to Benedict de Spinoza.}} (24 November 1632 – 21 February 1677) was a Dutch philosopher of Portuguese Sephardic Jewish origin. One of the foremost exponents of 17th-century Rationalism and one of the early and seminal thinkers of the Enlightenment and modern biblical criticism including modern conceptions of the self and the universe, he came to be considered "one of the most important philosophers—and certainly the most radical—of the early modern period." Inspired by the groundbreaking ideas of René Descartes, Spinoza became a leading philosophical figure of the Dutch Golden Age. Spinoza's given name, which means "Blessed", varies among different languages. In Hebrew, his full name is written . "In most of the documents and records contemporary with Spinoza's years within the Jewish community, his name is given as 'Bento'", Portuguese for "Blessed". In his works in Latin, he used the name Benedictus de Spinoza.

Spinoza was raised in the Spanish-Portuguese-Jewish community in Amsterdam. He developed highly controversial ideas regarding the authenticity of the Hebrew Bible and the nature of the Divine. Jewish religious authorities issued a ''herem'' () against him, causing him to be effectively expelled and shunned by Jewish society at age 23, including by his own family. He was frequently called an "atheist" by contemporaries, although nowhere in his work does Spinoza argue against the existence of God. Spinoza lived an outwardly simple life as an optical lens grinder, collaborating on microscope and telescope lens designs with Constantijn and Christiaan Huygens. He turned down rewards and honours throughout his life, including prestigious teaching positions. He died at the age of 44 in 1677 from a lung illness, perhaps tuberculosis or silicosis exacerbated by the inhalation of fine glass dust while grinding lenses. He is buried in the Christian churchyard of Nieuwe Kerk in The Hague. In June 1678 —just over a year after Spinoza's death—the States of Holland banned his entire works, since they “contain very many profane, blasphemous and atheistic propositions.” The prohibition included the owning, reading, distribution, copying, and restating of Spinoza's books, and even the reworking of his fundamental ideas. Shortly after (1679/1690) his books were added to the Catholic Church's ''Index of Forbidden Books''.

Spinoza's philosophy encompasses nearly every area of philosophical discourse, including metaphysics, epistemology, political philosophy, ethics, philosophy of mind, and philosophy of science. It earned Spinoza an enduring reputation as one of the most important and original thinkers of the seventeenth century. Spinoza's philosophy is largely contained in two books: the ''Theologico-Political Treatise'', and the ''Ethics''. The rest of the writings we have from Spinoza are either earlier or incomplete works expressing thoughts that were crystallized in the two aforementioned books (''e.g.'', the ''Short Treatise'' and the ''Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect''), or else they are not directly concerned with Spinoza's own philosophy (''e.g.'', ''The Principles of Cartesian Philosophy'' and ''The Hebrew Grammar''). He also left behind many letters that help to illuminate his ideas and provide some insight into what may have been motivating his views. The ''Theologico-Political Treatise'' was published during his lifetime, but Spinoza's ''magnum opus'', the ''Ethics'' which contains the entirety of his philosophical system in its most rigorous form, the ''Ethics'', was published posthumously in the year of his death. The work opposed Descartes's philosophy of mind–body dualism and earned Spinoza recognition as one of Western philosophy's most important thinkers.

Provided by Wikipedia
Showing 1 - 11 results of 11 for search 'Spinoza, Baruch de, 1632-1677.', query time: 0.01s Refine Results
1
by Spinoza, Baruch de, 1632-1677
Published 1918.
Libro
2
by Spinoza, Baruch de, 1632-1677.
Published s.f.
Libro
3
by Spinoza, Baruch de, 1632-1677.
Published 1958.
Libro
4
by Spinoza, Baruch de, 1632-1677.
Published 1966.
Libro
5
by Spinoza, Baruch de, 1632-1677.
Published 1984.
Libro
6
by Spinoza, Baruch de, 1632-1677.
Published 1915.
Libro
7
by Spinoza, Baruch de 1632-1677
Published c1944
Libro
9
10
by Spinoza, Baruch de, 1632-1677.
Published 2006
Libro
11
by Spinoza, Baruch de, 1632-1677.
Published 2005
Libro